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== ...be SU ==
It might be good if you are a superuser to continue. You can also run dirvish without being a superuser, but its more complex.
{{{
sudo su
}}}
Line 6: Line 12:

Backups reside in "banks". You can put multiple backups into one "bank".
A bank is simply a folder.

create one:
{{{
mkdir /backups
}}}

== Setup your first vault ==
A "vault" is a location inside a bank that contains a backup. You can put multiple backup jobs into the same bank.

Creating a vault is done by creating a subfolder with a special file in it. Given I want to backup "myserver":
{{{
/backups/myserver/dirvish/default.conf
}}}

Inside this file, you need to specify what dirvish should back up. If you want to make a backup of the local server (conveniently named "thishost", this is the result of the comman {{{hostname}}}), it would look like this:

{{{
client: thishost
tree: /
xdev: true
index: gzip
image-default: %Y%m%d
exclude:
 var/cache/apt/archives
 var/cache/man
 tmp
 var/tmp
}}}

== Initialize the vault ==
Before you go on, you must tell dirvish to initialize the vault.

go to your vault, and init it:

{{{
cd /backups
dirvish --vault myserver --init
}}}

== Configure Dirvish to know your bank ==
Edit the master configuration file in /etc/dirvish.conf or /etc/dirvish/master.conf.

Write the location of your bank there:
{{{
bank:
 /backups
}}}

Actually, you should write a few more lines into master.conf. This should get you started, read the manpage of ''dirvish.conf'' for more:
{{{
bank:
        /backups/

expire-default: +60 days
expire-rule:
        wd { sun } +60 days
        wd { 2-7 } +4 days

Runall:
        myserver
}}}

== Run it automatically with a cronjob ==

Backups are based when you run then automatically. For the beginning you can use something simple like this:
{{{
0 0 * * * root /usr/local/bin/dirvish-expire --quiet ; /usr/local/bin/dirvish-runall --quiet
}}}
You should always run dirvish-expire first. It is responsible for removing snapshots which have exceeded your retention policy time period, freeing up space you may need for the next run of dirvish-runall. Ensure you allow enough time for dirvish-expire to finish.


== More ==
There is a simple and good guide here: http://www.dirvish.org/debian.howto.html
There is a bigger guide here: http://wiki.edseek.com/howto:dirvish . Some of the text from over there is reused here.


Ready? Then head on to the DirvishTips to learn more.

Using Dirvish

After installing it (depending on your distribution this could be as easy as "sudo apt-get install dirvish"), you need to configure banks.

...be SU

It might be good if you are a superuser to continue. You can also run dirvish without being a superuser, but its more complex.

sudo su

Setup your first bank

Backups reside in "banks". You can put multiple backups into one "bank". A bank is simply a folder.

create one:

mkdir /backups

Setup your first vault

A "vault" is a location inside a bank that contains a backup. You can put multiple backup jobs into the same bank.

Creating a vault is done by creating a subfolder with a special file in it. Given I want to backup "myserver":

/backups/myserver/dirvish/default.conf

Inside this file, you need to specify what dirvish should back up. If you want to make a backup of the local server (conveniently named "thishost", this is the result of the comman hostname), it would look like this:

client: thishost
tree: /
xdev: true
index: gzip
image-default: %Y%m%d
exclude:
        var/cache/apt/archives
        var/cache/man
        tmp
        var/tmp

Initialize the vault

Before you go on, you must tell dirvish to initialize the vault.

go to your vault, and init it:

cd /backups
dirvish --vault myserver --init

Configure Dirvish to know your bank

Edit the master configuration file in /etc/dirvish.conf or /etc/dirvish/master.conf.

Write the location of your bank there:

bank:
 /backups

Actually, you should write a few more lines into master.conf. This should get you started, read the manpage of dirvish.conf for more:

bank:
        /backups/

expire-default: +60 days
expire-rule:
        wd { sun }      +60 days
        wd { 2-7 }      +4 days

Runall:
        myserver

Run it automatically with a cronjob

Backups are based when you run then automatically. For the beginning you can use something simple like this:

0 0 * * *  root  /usr/local/bin/dirvish-expire --quiet ; /usr/local/bin/dirvish-runall --quiet

You should always run dirvish-expire first. It is responsible for removing snapshots which have exceeded your retention policy time period, freeing up space you may need for the next run of dirvish-runall. Ensure you allow enough time for dirvish-expire to finish.

More

There is a simple and good guide here: http://www.dirvish.org/debian.howto.html There is a bigger guide here: http://wiki.edseek.com/howto:dirvish . Some of the text from over there is reused here.

Ready? Then head on to the DirvishTips to learn more.

DirvishUsage (last edited 2011-08-14 08:58:28 by 213-33-10-151)